Make a Positive Impression During Phone Meetings

conference-room

Chances are you’ve seen this TV commercial for pretzel snacks where a young man working from home is on the phone while his colleagues across town wait in an uncomfortable silence listening to the man’s loud snacking over the intercom. Until one  of the colleagues finally suggests that he should disconnect the line.

I imagine somewhere in the world, someone has made that mistake during a phone meeting. That kind of mistake probably doesn’t go over very well with employers or clients. The young man probably could have spared himself much embarrassment if he used common sense and followed certain meeting prep guidelines.

With more remote workers and better technology, phone meetings are becoming more commonplace. When participating in phone meetings, it can be tempting to do your own thing. No matter where you work – at home, in an office, hotel room or co-working space – it’s important to present a positive image, even when the other meeting participants can’t see you.

Good impressions in telephone meetings are important for several reasons, writes Darlene Price, author of Well Said: Presentations and Conversations That Get Results in a recent Forbes interview. Phone meetings are more common because of newer technologies, so it’s easier, faster and cheaper to get key individuals into a phone meeting at one time.

Second, phone meetings often serve as the initial introduction to a company or potential client. As the old adage goes, you never get a second chance to make a good first impression. The first 10-15 seconds of a meeting can make or break your chances for success. So make sure you are ready from the get-go. If you miss the opportunity to make a good impression in the introduction stage, you may not get another chance.

Finally a positive phone presentation can lead to better opportunities and career advancement, says Price.  When you speak confidently, people take notice because you come across as a strong, confident leader. They are more likely to listen to what you have to say. You’re able to persuade others to a call for action, such as support a cause, fund a project, negotiate a pay raise or win a new client.

A professional phone image is more than just your voice. It’s also the way you dress. Business meetings are still business, so dress appropriately as if you were there in person.

Numerous other factors can make or break your meeting. Here’s a quick rundown to help you prepare for your phone meeting to ensure a successful outcome.

1. Do your homework. If this is the first time you are speaking with the other person or with this company, find out more about them ahead of time. Check out the person’s LinkedIn profile and find out what organizations they belong to. Browse their company website to find out its history, mission statement and latest accomplishments. The more you know about who you are dealing with, the more comfortable you will feel during the phone meeting.

2. Be prepared. Compile notes, and keep them nearby so you can refer to them easily. Make a list of questions you want to ask and key points you want to cover. If you plan to use your cell phone and laptop, keep them fully charged and ready to go. Keep a glass of water nearby too in case you get thirsty and sip it quietly between questions. If you have a tendency toward allergies and nasal congestion, it might help to gargle with salt water to clear your throat beforehand.

3. Find a quiet place to converse. A small sitting room, your living room, even a closet will work. I would avoid coffee shops because they can get too busy and noisy, especially if they play music overhead. You want to be able to converse without distractions.

4. Get comfortable. Find a comfortable seat wherever you are. Sit up straight and practice good posture. Don’t slouch. I know I sound like your grade school teacher saying that, but it’s true. When you slouch, you lose energy. When you sit tall and straight, you breathe more easily through the body and you feel more energized.

5. Be on time for your meeting. Don’t linger in the bathroom to practice your speech. Being on time shows you take the meeting seriously and that you are prepared.

6. Be succinct with your answers. When others in the phone meeting ask questions, be brief and to the point. Don’t give long-winded answers or go off topic, which can give the impression that you aren’t prepared

While these are the most important things to consider when planning for your phone meeting, here are a few other things you should NOT do, according to Glassdoor.

1. Don’t talk about your personal life. Unless the client or other party asks about your weekend or ask how you deal with stress, keep your personal life out of the conversation.

2. Resist the urge to multi-task. Don’t try to write a proposal during a phone meeting which can only distract you from the conversation. Give the meeting your full attention and take notes. If your mind is elsewhere, you might miss an important detail.

3. Never talk over the interviewer. Allow the interviewer to finish asking their question before jumping in with your answer. In fact, wait one or two beats before answering. Those few seconds allow you to absorb the meaning of their question and gather your thoughts.

4. Don’t assume your phone reception is good. No matter where you are, even at home, you may get spotty reception or the Internet service goes does. Test the connection beforehand by either calling your cell phone from a landline or asking a friend to call you.

One final thought: Don’t chew gum or eat during the phone meeting. This is a no-brainer. Just because other participants can’t see you doesn’t mean you can start snacking away. Don’t be that guy in the TV commercial. Phone meetings are no time to get complacent.

Four Fun Activities to Break the Ice at Networking Events

Group of guys
Image courtesy of Hub Spot

Networking events can be tedious to attend, especially if you’re uncomfortable meeting new people. But they can be difficult to plan as well, particularly if the point of the event is to introduce participants to one another. It can be a challenge to come up with fun and innovative ways for participants to get acquainted.

In all the meetings and events I’ve attended over the years, a few have stood out for their sense of fun and creativity. That’s because the planners started off with an innovative ice breaker that set the tone for the evening.

Below are a few of those ice breakers. The next time you are faced with planning a networking event, experiment with one of these ideas. You can find other ideas by following the links at the bottom of this article.

1. The M&M Game 
As participants enter the room, invite them to grab a handful of M&Ms from a bowl. Once they are seated, have them set aside three individual candies of different colors, which will be used as part of their introduction. Before they introduce themselves, the leader will reveal a set of questions they must answer based on their three candy colors they chose. The questions can be personal or business-related. For example, a red M&M might mean: What do you hope to learn from this session? A green one might mean: What business are you in? You get the idea. This exercise puts a twist on the traditional introduction at the start of the session. Plus you get to eat the candies afterward.

2. Fill-in-the-Blank Index Card
Each participant is handed an index card with twelve boxes, each containing a clue. Using the clues as a guide, the participant’s task is to match a person with the clue. For example, the clue might be “has green eyes.” The task is to find someone else attending the event who has green eyes. That person will put their signatures on that square. Each participant must move around the room, getting signatures from other attendees that match the description on the card. For larger crowds, it might be helpful to have three or four different versions of the card. Other suggested clues: shoe color, hair color, traveled to Europe (or Asia or South America), has a dog, has a bird, plays tennis, reads comic books, practices yoga, has three or more kids, lives in a high-rise building, lives in the suburbs, drives a SUV, etc. Mix it up. The goal is to have the card completely signed by twelve different individuals. This exercise assures that everyone meets at least twelve people during the event. It’s a great way to build a network in a safe, fun environment. For more fun, offer a prize for the first person to complete their card before the program begins.

3. The “Who Am I?” Guessing Game
Especially fun for a more relaxed environment, such as a part or a picnic. As people arrive, put a piece of paper on their backs with the name of a celebrity or other famous personality. Since they won’t know who they are, their task is to figure it out by asking questions about their famous personality. But there are three rules: They can ask no more than twenty questions; the questions must be answered with a simple ‘yes’ or ‘no’; the questions must be asked of twenty different people. For example, “Am I a female?”, and “Am I singer?” They keep asking questions until the answers add up to a complete picture of their character. Ideally, they will have met at least twenty individuals along the way. For more fun, you might consider offering a prize to the person who guesses who they are with the fewest clues.

4. Speed Networking
 Speed networking is just like speed dating, except you’re not looking for someone to date, but someone to do business with, offer your services to or hire for a position at your company. Mind you, I have never heard of or participated in a speed networking event, but hey, if it works for dating, why not for business networking?

Speed networking would work like this. When people arrive, they are divided into group A and group B, regardless of gender. Just like with speed dating, group A people will remain seated at each of the tables while group B switch seats as they move from one table to the next for each round of conversation. Allow a set period of time for conversation, say five minutes, before the bell sounds and the line moves on. Participants can always continue their conversations after the speed networking event. After two hours, imagine how many people you could add to your business network. Many of them may not fit your needs at that time, but keep their business cards. You never know when you might need to talk with them later. (Editor’s note: I’ve never participated in a speed networking event, though I’m sure there are events similar in nature.)

Networking doesn’t have to be all work and no play. With some ingenuity, you can help participants break the ice with each other and get your meetings off to a rollicking, productive start.

Related Articles:
20 Icebreakers to Make Your Next Meeting Fun
6 Icebreaker Games For Work That Your Team Will Love
The 10 Best Icebreaker Activities for Any Work Event